October 5, 2022 Veggie Feast (CSA)

Notes From the Farm

Hello! This is the final week of veggies. As some of you have heard we are taking a sabbatical next year from Veggie Feast/ CSA boxes. We have provided organically grown vegetables for the Bitterroot community for over 20 years.

Closing this chapter of our lives is bittersweet. We have had the opportunity to do honest work, be outside, make our own schedule, meet some fabulous people, and be available for our kids. But agriculture is a challenging business. Just like many small business owners we work all the time. Growing vegetables takes an enormous amount of labor. Even though it seems expensive when you are loading your cart at the store, the amount of time and energy that goes into our food is not monetarily compensated. It is the big ag businesses that get the subsidies. The only way for smaller farms to make money is to produce more (so the meager profit adds up), depend on underpaid labor (hello interns), go fund me type campaigns, or grants. On top of the low-to-no-pay the ironic and cruel twist is only the fairly affluent can afford to buy organic food. The farmer simply cannot afford to sell for less, and the impoverished simply cannot afford to pay the higher price.

So we are looking at other ways to lend a hand and make a difference. It’s impossible not to see the dramatic changes in growing conditions and weather patterns and wonder what that means for our country’s food security. Next year we aspire to test our method of farming against current “standard” farming practices in hopes of showing others how to improve soil conditions, save labor costs and reduce water use. Leon is also gearing up for his “How to grow a small farm/ garden” course this fall through the O’Hara Commons, and plans to put more effort into education so people can feed themselves and their neighbors.

We thank you all for making the effort to eat locally. We hope you continue to support other farms in the area.

This Week’s Veggie Feast

Spaghetti Squash, Sunchokes, Brussels Sprouts, Sweet Onions, Spinach, Tomatoes, Peppers, Swiss Chard

New This Week

Spaghetti squash

Spaghetti squash can be used in lieu of pasta. Check out Delish to explore a variety of ways to prepare this versatile food.

Sunchokes

Sunchokes (also known as Jerusalem artichokes) are a new vegetable for many people. They are gaining popularity in recent years due to their high nutritional value, high fiber (in the form of inulin) and low carb content. Since we dig them up, like a potato I assumed they were a tuber, but according to Serious Eats: “A sunchoke is a woody-looking tuberous formation found on the rhizome (horizontally growing underground stem) of a type of sunflower.” Sunchokes are very versatile, they can be fried, roasted, steamed and eaten raw. Add them to a roasted vegetable dish, use as a base for soups, or thinly slice as a topper for a fall salad. They store well in the fridge in a container or a plastic bag for a couple of weeks.

Recipes

Apple Sunchoke Salad

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
  • 2 pounds sunchokes, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh dill
  • 1 tablespoon chopped shallots
  • 2 tablespoons unfiltered apple cider
  • 2 ½ tablespoons cider vinegar
  • 1 cup halved, cored, and thinly sliced Granny Smith apples
  • 1 cup halved, cored, and thinly sliced Honeycrisp apples
  • 6 ounces skinned smoked trout, broken into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons sliced fresh basil

Instructions

Instructions Checklist

  • Preheat oven to 400°.
  • Combine 1 tablespoon oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and sunchokes in a large bowl; toss to coat. Spread sunchokes, cut sides down, on a baking sheet; bake at 400° for 25 minutes or just until tender and golden. Cool completely.
  • Combine dill, shallots, apple cider, cider vinegar, remaining 2 tablespoons oil, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper in a large bowl. Add apples and sunchokes; toss gently. Place on a serving plate. Top with trout and basil.

Source: My Recipes

Smashed Sunchokes with Thyme Butter

Ingredients

  • 1 pound (450g) sunchokes, rinsed and trimmed of any dark spots
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons (20ml) canola or other neutral oil
  • 2 tablespoons (1 ounce; 30g) unsalted butter
  • Large pinch freshly picked thyme leaves
  • Flaky salt for serving

Instructions

  1. In a medium saucepan, cover sunchokes with 1 inch cold water. Season generously with salt (the water should taste nicely salted, as if you were seasoning soup). Set over high heat and bring to a boil, then reduce heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Cook until paring knife inserted into a sunchoke meets little resistance, about 10 minutes; be careful not to overcook.
  2. Drain sunchokes using fine-mesh strainer or colander. When cool enough to handle, place sunchokes on work surface or cutting board. Working 1 sunchoke at a time, use the bottom of a heavy skillet to press firmly on each sunchoke until it is flattened but still in one piece; take care not to press so hard that the sunchokes break apart.
  3. In a large cast iron skillet, heat oil over medium heat until shimmering. Add sunchokes in a single layer and cook without moving until well browned, about 3 minutes. Flip sunchokes, then add butter to the pan and allow to melt. Add half of thyme to the melted butter and continue to cook, spooning butter over sunchokes, until browned on the second side, about 3 minutes longer.
  4. Transfer sunchokes to a serving plate and spoon the thyme butter on top. Garnish with remaining freshly picked thyme leaves and sprinkle with flaky salt. Serve immediately.

Source: Serious Eats

September 28, 2022 Veggie Feast (CSA)

Notes From the Farm

A variety of flowers we grow to attract pollinators…. evening primrose, borage, hollyhock

This Week’s Veggie Feast

Potatoes, Radishes, Spinach, Kale, Red Cabbage, Cilantro, Pepper Mix

Recipes

Sauteed Potatoes with Kale and Nigella

…. a little note from the NYT cooking

“One of the reasons we love latkes so much is because the browned crispy edges of potatoes are so delicious. Even when they are just browned and not particularly crispy, as they are here, they are irresistible. It helps to use a heavy nonstick pan for these so that you can cook the potatoes long enough and on high enough heat to get the browned edges, without losing those edges to the surface of the pan, where they will undoubtedly stick once they have absorbed the oil. I have been using a potato called simply “yellow potatoes” for this; they are slightly starchy, just a little less so than a Yukon gold or a fingerling, both of which will work just as well. Blanch the kale before you cook the potatoes, cut it into slivers, and add to the potatoes once they are tender. I season the mix with nigella seeds, one of my favorite spices; you can also add something with a kick, like cayenne or chile powder, if you want to pump up the heat.”

Ingredients

  • 1bunch black kale (about ½ pound), stemmed, leaves washed in 2 changes water
  • Salt
  • 2tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1½pounds potatoes, such as yellow potatoes or Yukon golds, cut in small dice (about ½ inch)
  • 2shallots, minced
  • 1teaspoon nigella seeds
  • Freshly ground pepper

Instructions

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil while you clean kale. When water comes to a boil, salt generously and add kale. Blanch 2 to 3 minutes, until just tender. Transfer to a bowl of cold water, drain and squeeze out excess water, taking it up by the handful. Cut squeezed bunches of kale into slivers and set aside.
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over high heat in a heavy, preferably nonstick, 12-inch skillet and add potatoes. Turn heat down to medium-high and sear without stirring for 5 minutes, then shake and toss in pan for another 5 to 8 minutes, or until just tender and lightly browned. Add salt and continue to toss in pan for another minute or two, until tender. Add remaining teaspoon oil, shallots and nigella seeds and cook, stirring until shallots are tender and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Stir in kale and additional salt if desired and cook, stirring or tossing in the pan for another 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat, taste and adjust seasonings, and serve.

Source: New York Times Cooking

September 21, 2022 Veggie Feast (CSA)

Notes From the Farm

This Week’s Veggie Feast

Corn, Salad mix, Beets, Tomatoes, Arugula, Radishes, Sweet Onions

Recipes

Corn Fritters

Ingredients

  • 6 ears of corn (about 3 cups corn)
  • 4 scallions, both white and greens finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped herbs of your choice (I used chives)
  • About 1 cup (6 ounces) grated sharp cheddar
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour, plus 2 more tablespoons if needed
  • Olive or a neutral oil for frying (I used safflower)

Instructions

Shuck corn and stand the first stalk in a large bowl. Use a sharp knife to cut the kernels from the corn into the bowl, then run the back of your knife up and down the stalk to release as much “milk” as possible into the bowl. Repeat with remaining ears. It’s okay if you get a little more or a little less than 3 cups of corn.

Add scallions, herbs, cheese, and many grinds of black pepper and stir to evenly combine. Taste for seasoning; I usually find I needed more salt and pepper. Add the eggs and use a fork or spoon to stir until they’re all broken up and evenly coat the corn mixture. Add 1 cup of flour and stir to throughly coat. My mixture at this point (especially with bi-color corn) looked precisely like egg salad, to give you an idea of what you’re looking for: mostly kernels and just a little visible batter to bind it. A scoop of it should hold its shape unless pressed down; if yours does not, add the remaining flour. (For reference, I needed it.)

Heat 2 to 3 tablespoons oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Once hot and shimmering, add your first scoop of corn fritter batter and press it gently to flatten it. (I used a #40 scoop, which holds a little less than 2 tablespoons. Tinier fritters are easier to manage.) Corn fritters cook quickly so keep an eye on them. When the underside is a deep golden brown, flip and cook to the same color on the second side. Drain on a paper towel, sprinkling on more salt. When it’s cool enough to try, taste and adjust the seasonings of the remaining batter if needed.

(Deborah Madison advises that if your fritter isn’t holding to add another egg and 1/3 cup flour to give it more “glue” but I didn’t find this necessary.)

Cook remaining fritters in the same manner, adding more oil as needed. Try to get them to the table before finishing them.

Do ahead: Fritters keep well in the fridge for up to 3 days, and freeze well too. I like to defrost and re-toast them in a 350 degree oven.

Source: The Smitten Kitchen

Arugula Pesto

It’s interesting to read recipes and watch where I get all incredulous. 1) Toasting nuts in a microwave???? 2) Does anyone actually use a mortar and pestle?

Ingredients

  • 2 cups packed arugula leaves, stems removed
  • 1/2 cup shelled walnuts
  • 1/2 cup fresh Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, unpeeled
  • 1/2 clove garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Instructions

  1. Brown the garlic: Brown 6 garlic cloves with their peels on in a skillet over medium high heat until the garlic is lightly browned in places, about 10 minutes. Remove the garlic from the pan, cool, and remove the skins.
  2. Toast the nuts: Toast the nuts in a pan over medium heat until lightly brown, or heat in a microwave on high heat for a minute or two until you get that roasted flavor. In our microwave it takes 2 minutes.
  3. 3a Process in food processor: (the fast way) Combine the arugula, salt, walnuts, roasted and raw garlic into a food processor. Pulse while drizzling the olive oil into the processor. Remove the mixture from the processor and put it into a bowl. Stir in the Parmesan cheese.
  4. 3b Use Mortar and pestle. Combine the nuts, salt and garlic in a mortar. With the pestle, grind until smooth. Add the cheese and olive oil, grind again until smooth. Finely chop the arugula and add it to the mortar. Grind up with the other ingredients until smooth.
  5. Adjust to taste: Because the pesto is so dependent on the individual ingredients, and the strength of the ingredients depends on the season or variety, test it and add more of the ingredients to taste.

Source: Simply Recipes

September 14, 2022 Veggie Feast (CSA)

Notes From the Farm

This Week’s Veggie Feast

Corn, Brussels Sprouts, Carrots, Poblano Peppers, Salad, Tomatoes, Swiss Chard

New This Week

Sweet corn

Leon planted our corn later than usual this season due to the cold June (remember that?). The birds were looking for it in August, whole flocks. I am sure we didn’t outwit them but it’s nice to think that we tried.

Brussels sprouts

Brussels sprouts can last a long time but they are best when eaten sooner than later, as their flavor becomes more assertive over time.  Any food item that goes well with cabbage or cauliflower also makes a great pairing with Brussels sprouts, including butter, cream, blue cheese, mustard, capers, garlic, bacon, and vinegar.  Brussels take well to steaming, roasting, or braising.  If cooking whole, cutting an X in the bottom brings heat to their centers more quickly.  Generally the small round heads are cut in half or thinly sliced, allowing them to cook faster and better absorb more sauce or seasoning.

Carrots

First of the season for us, yum.

Poblano peppers

Poblano Peppers are usually used in sauces, salsas, and stuffing mixes. The membranes and seeds of Poblano peppers is where most of the heat is found. So, if you don’t want it to be quite so spicy, be sure to take the veins and seeds out before using the pepper.

To prepare Poblano peppers it is best to roast them with a little olive oil or grill them until they are soft enough to peel the skin from the pepper. To do this without a lot of hassle it is best to roast the Poblanos with a little olive oil then place them in a bowl covered with plastic wrap so the steam helps to separate the skin from the flesh. Before long the skin will be soft enough to peel off in sheets. Some recipes will call for searing Poblanos until the skin is black by placing them in a broiler or over an open flame.

Poblanos can be stored and even frozen in airtight containers for many months until you are ready to use them. You can also choose to dry the peppers out for later use. Dried Poblanos are also known as Ancho chiles, which means wide chile in the Spanish language. They are given this name because when Poblano peppers are dried they become very flat, wide, and heart-shaped.

Source: pablano.com

Recipes

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Balsamic Vinegar

This recipe was shared by one of my favorite foodie friends, Emily, and it is her favorite way to cook and eat Brussels sprouts.  Simple, quick, and delicious.  For those of you who need a bit of protein, bacon or pancetta would make a great addition to this dish.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound of Brussels sprouts
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • salt and freshly milled pepper
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries, optional
  • 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. 
  • Cut Brussels sprouts in half lengthwise and remove any yellow or wilted leaves. 
  • Toss well with olive oil, salt, pepper, and cherries. 
  • Roast on a sheet pan for 15 minutes. 
  • Remove from oven and gently toss halves with balsamic vinegar. 
  • Continue roasting for 10-15 minutes, checking occasionally to make sure the balsamic vinegar does not over caramelize. 
  • Serve while still warm.

Southwest Stuffed Poblano Peppers

We make quite a few stuffed peppers, you can stuff them with whatever you fancy, but here’s a recipe… I did take the liberty to replace some of the canned ingredients….why use canned tomatoes when you have fresh ones? And garlic powder makes me shudder cause it tastes so off, but off you go to make your own magical stuffed pepper

Ingredients

  • 4 poblano peppers halved and seeds/membranes removed
  • 1 pound lean ground beef OR chorizo
  • 1 teaspoon each ground cumin, chili powder, diced garlic
  • 1 cup cooked long grain white rice
  • ½ cup cooked black beans
  • ½ cup corn 
  • Tomatoes
  • Green chiles
  • ½-1 cup grated mozzarella

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees and lightly grease a large baking sheet. Arrange halved poblano peppers in a single layer on the baking sheet so that they aren’t overlapping. Bake for 10-15 minutes while you move on to the next step. 
  • Add ground beef (or preferred meat choice) and rice to a large skillet, and season with the cumin, chili powder, and garlic. Saute over medium heat for 5-8 minutes until meat is browned and cooked through. 
  • Stir in the black beans, corn, diced tomatoes, and green chiles. Cook another 1-2 minutes. Spoon mixture into the peppers, sprinkle with cheese, and return to oven for another 10 minutes or so until peppers are tender and cheese is melted. Allow to cool slightly before serving. 

Slightly adapted from: Creme de la Crumb

September 7, 2022 Veggie Feast/CSA

Notes From the Farm

This Week’s Veggie Feast

Red Cabbage, Bell Pepper, Leeks, Dragon Tongue Beans, Beets, Tomatoes, Cucumber

New This Week

Red cabbage

Red cabbage displays brilliant leaves of either a crimson or purple color with white veins running through them, and with its hue comes additional health benefits not found in green cabbage.

Red cabbage is often used raw for salads and coleslaw. This vegetable can be eaten cooked. It is the traditional accompanying side dish paired with many German meals—most notably, Sauerbrauten.

Keep cabbage cold to help retain its vitamin C content.

Green Bell Peppers

Green bell peppers are, in fact, the unripe bell pepper, whereas other bell pepper colors are ripe. Green bell peppers are often sweeter than the colored varieties of bell peppers but taste and texture of the bell pepper can be also be affected by growing, storage conditions and cultivar species.

Leeks

The edible part of a leek is the white part plus an inch or so of pale green.  Smaller leeks are more tender, making them perfect for grilling or braising, while larger leeks are perfect for soup and gratins.  Due to how leeks are grown, they often have lots of dirt between the leaves so they need to be washed well.  Cut off the greens an inch above the white part and slice off the roots, leaving a thin piece attached so that the leaves remained joined at the base.  Halve the leeks lengthwise down the middle to the root end.  Rinse well under running water while you fan the leaves to make sure you are getting dirt stuck between leaves.  Cut leaves can also be rinsed after cutting.  If using in a soup, leeks do not caramelize well so they are best lightly cooked.  In addition to the classic Vichyssoise and Cock-a-Leekie soups, leeks go well with potatoes, fennel, celery, capers, parmesan, goat cheese and olives.

Dragon Tongue Beans

The bright colored dragon tongue beans are considered a heirloom Dutch wax type green bean that originated in the Netherlands.  This yellowish-green bean with variegated purple strips is great both raw and cooked.  Once cooked or pickled, the purple color tends to dissipate.  Like other varieties of bush beans, dragon tongue beans have an edible shell.   Just remove the stem end before cooking.  If not serving raw, these beans will make a great addition to bean salads, stir fries, salads, or cooked on their own for a side dish. 

Recipes

Dragon Tongue Bean Salad

Ingredients

For the dressing

  • 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • 1½ teaspoons chili paste
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • a few turns of freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

For the salad

  • 1 pound Dragon Tongue beans, washed and dried, root ends trimmed
  • 2 cups loosely packed mixed micro greens, washed and dried
  • a few red Thai chile peppers for garnish and added heat if desired

Instructions

For the dressing

  • Add the vinegar, mustard, honey, chili paste, salt and pepper to a small bowl. Whisk until smooth. Gradually add the oil while still whisking. Once it’s smooth, set aside.

For the salad

  • Prepare a large mixing bowl with ice water and set it aside.
  • Place a steamer rack into a pot with the water level just below it. Over high heat, bring the water to a boil and then add the beans to the rack, sprinkle lightly with salt and cover. Steam just until they’re about 50% more tender, about 3 minutes.
  • Immediately drain and add the beans to the bowl of ice water — this will help preserve any bits of purple still remaining. Let them sit in the ice water until they’re cold, then drain, dry them, and add them to a large mixing bowl.
  • Toss the beans with the micro greens and the dressing.
  • Wash, dry, and slice the red chile peppers in half for garnish (and added heat) if desired.
  • Serve!

Source: Cooking on the Weekends

Roasted Leeks with Olive Oil and Parmesan

Ingredients

  • 6 leeks
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan

Instructions

  • Preheat your oven to 425 degrees F.
  • Trim the hairy bottom of the white part of the leeks. Trim the dark greens, leaving the white and light green part only.
  • Cut the leeks in half lengthwise, then rinse them well (there’s often dirt trapped in there) and dry. Arrange them in a 9 X 13 baking dish, cut side down.
  • Drizzle the leeks with the olive oil and use your hands to thoroughly coat them. Sprinkle them with salt and pepper.
  • Roast them for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven, turn so that their cut side is up, sprinkle with the Parmesan, then continue roasting until fork-tender and golden brown, about 10 more minutes.

Source: Healthy Recipes

Date, Feta and Red Cabbage Salad

If you don’t like your cabbage too crunchy, dressing it as directed and letting it rest in the salad bowl for a while before adding the other ingredients will soften and wilt it a bit.

Serves 4 to 6 as a side

Ingredients

  • 1 to 1 1/4 pounds red cabbage (1 small head or half of a large one), sliced very thin
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons lime or lemon juice (I use lime)
  • Salt and red pepper flakes (I used the mild Aleppo variety) to taste
  • About 1/2 cup pitted dates, coarsely chopped or sliced
  • 4 ounces feta, crumbled into chunks
  • 1 tablespoon chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 teaspoons well-toasted sesame seeds

Instructions

  • Toss cabbage with olive oil and first tablespoons of lime juice, plus salt and pepper, coating leaves evenly.
  • Taste and add more lime juice, salt and pepper to taste. I do this a few times, making sure I really get this base well seasoned because it will be hard to do it as well later.
  • Toss dressed cabbage gently with half of dates and feta.
  • Sprinkle with remaining dates, then feta, then parsley and sesame seeds. Dig in.
  • Do ahead: The whole salad can sit assembled for at least an hour, if not longer in the fridge. Mine is going strong on the second day. You can also prepare the parts separately (feta, chopped dates, sliced cabbage) to assemble right before serving.

Source: Smitten Kitchen

August 31, 2022 Veggie Feast/CSA

This Week’s Veggie Feast

Anaheim Peppers, Yellow Beans, Broccoli, Green Beans, Sweet Onion, Fennel, Potatoes, Swiss Chard, Summer Squash

New This Week

Anaheims

Anaheim peppers (also known as chile Verde del Norte) are widely grown throughout northwest Mexico. These light green chiles are long, taper at the base and are usually mild in flavor. These peppers are great in chili, fajitas, burritos, veggie egg scrambles, enchiladas, or salsas, or can be stuffed and baked. As with any pepper, their flavor varies, so please taste test a tiny bit to see how much heat the pepper carries. If you are sensitive to spicy food, you will need to remove any seeds and white ribs from the pepper before cooking. Be aware of cutting hot peppers with bare hands, as you need to wash your hands well before touching any sensitive body areas! If you don’t plan to use them while fresh, the whole chili can be roasted and then frozen for later use.

Yellow Beans

Yellow wax beans are a yellow version of the familiar green bean.  If you won’t be eating them right away store in a sealed container in the refrigerator.  If you would like to store beans for later usage they can be blanched, shocked and then frozen for winter use.  Stringing is seldom necessary now that many varieties are stringless, but the stem end is often removed since it can be tough.  Yellow wax beans are great for snacking on or served on a vegetable tray with your favorite dip.  Yellow wax beans can be prepared just like green beans to make your favorite summer bean salad, or they can be added to many stir fry dishes.

Recipes

Roasted Broccoli Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 large head of roasted broccoli
  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
  • 10 kalamata olives, sliced in half
  • 1/4 cup feta or vegan feta(optional)
  • lemon zest from one lemon

Maple Mustard Seed Dressing

  • 1 tablespoon whole grain mustard
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon fresh tarragon
  • 1/8 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon shallots, minced

Instructions

  1. Roast the broccoli.  (Instructions here.)
  2. While broccoli is roasting, make the dressing.  In a bowl, whisk together whole grain mustard, maple syrup, lemon juice, olive oil, tarragon, shallot, salt and pepper.
  3. Cut cooled broccoli into bite-sized pieces.
  4. Toss in a bowl with the kalamata olives and half of the dressing.
  5. Transfer to a serving bowl.  Top with almonds, lemon zest and feta cheese.  Drizzle on more dressing as needed. Serve at room temperature.

Notes

Salad will keep up to 4 days in the fridge.

Source: Feasting at Home

Green Beans with Almond Pesto

This makes a great heap of green beans (double what you see in my photos), which could easily serve 6 to 8 people. You might find it easier to make the full amount of pesto and keep it in the fridge (it will keep for a week, if not longer), and use it with portions of green beans as needed.

Ingredients

2 pounds green beans
1 cup (5 ounces or 140 grams) almonds, toasted and cooled
1 1/4 ounces (about 1/3 cup grated) parmesan or aged pecorino cheese, but no need to grate if using a food processor
1 small garlic clove, peeled and crushed
Leaves from a sprig or two of thyme
Pinches of red pepper flakes, to taste
1/4 teaspoon coarse sea or kosher salt
2 to 3 teaspoons white wine vinegar
1/3 cup olive oil, plus extra for drizzling

Instructions

Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Trim green beans — I find using kitchen shears the quickest way — and cook beans in boiling water until crisp tender, about 3 to 4 minutes for regular green beans or 2 to 3 minutes for the skinnier “haricot vert” variety. Plunge in an ice water bath to fully cool. Drain and pat dry. (If you have no patience for the precision of ice water baths, take the green beans out a full minute early as they will continue cooking as they cool.)

In food processor, grind almonds, cheese, garlic, thyme, pepper and salt to a coarse paste. Add vinegar, and pulse again. Stir in oil and adjust seasonings to taste.

Toss cooled green beans with almond pesto. Drizzling with extra olive oil for a fresh glisten. Dig in.

Serving suggestions: a mix of cherry tomatoes, grilled bread drizzled with olive oil and rubbed with a halved garlic clove or even grilled sausages.

Source: Smitten Kitchen