CSA September 3, 2014

Notes from the Farm

Our big news this week is that our pasture got flooded from a neighbor’s irrigation, which basically drowned most of the onion crop. You will be receiving a few of the survivors in this week’s share. Please accept our apologies if they’re not the prettiest onions you’ve ever seen. Also, please remember to return your empty boxes when you pick up each week’s share. We’re completely out. Thank you!

This Week’s CSA

celeriac root

celeriac

Celeriac can be eaten both cooked and grated raw for salads. For cooking purposes, this root vegetable takes well to soups, purees, and gratins. The root needs to be scrubbed well and peeled. To peel the root, cut the top and bottom ends off to create a stable surface and then using your knife, cut away the peel in a downward motion. If you have a heavy duty peeler, you can try using that if the root is not to knobby. Cut pieces turn brown quickly, so place cut pieces in a bowl of water acidulated with lemon juice or vinegar. If you prefer to use the entire vegetable, any pairings from peeling can be put in a vegetable stock. Take time to remove and save the green ribs before storing, which can be added to stocks or soups.

chives

Chives

A delicate member of the onion family, chives provide a discreet onion flavor that works well with egg dishes, mild cream based sauces, or as a garnish to salads or soups. Chives are best used fresh and added at the end of cooking. Snip them with scissors or cut with a sharp knife straight across. Store fresh chives in a plastic bag in the refrigerator.

 

cucumbers

cucumbersAs they sit, slicing cukes tend to soften, so they are best eaten fresh. Sliced thin, cucumbers are a treat on any sandwich or salad, served on a veggie platter or just eaten fresh with a sprinkling of salt. For a twist on a refreshing summer drink, add very thin slices of cucumber to sparkling water or as a garnish to gin and tonics. Cucumbers also make a refreshing, light salad or can be added to coleslaw. Making sure they are free of dirt and dry, cucumbers can be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for a week or longer. Too much moisture can cause them to mold, so make sure they are exposed to air.  Once cut open, wrap cut end in plastic wrap.

 

Nardello peppers

nardelloNardello peppers are an heirloom variety that hails from southern Italy and named after the man who brought the seed to the United States. These sweet peppers are mild and sweet with a crinkly green exterior. Sweet peppers go well with tomatoes, eggplant, onions, summer squash, olives, capers, mozzarella, Fontina, goat cheese, basil, garlic, and olive oil.  If not using right away, store peppers in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. They will keep for a week or more but too much moisture in the bag will cause them to mold.

onions (Walla Walla and red)

red onion

Red onions, sometimes called purple onions, are cultivars of the onion with purplish red skin and white flesh tinged with red. These onions tend to be medium to large in size and have a mild to sweet flavor. They are often consumed raw, grilled or lightly cooked with other foods, or added as color to salads. They tend to lose their redness when cooked. Red onions are available throughout the year. The red color comes from anthocyanidins such as cyanidin. Red onions are high in flavonoids. They can be stored 3 to 4 months at room temperature.

 

 

potatoes

potatoesStore potatoes in a cool, well ventilated place. Colder temperatures lower than 50 degrees, such as in the refrigerator, cause a potato’s starch to convert to sugar, resulting in a sweet taste and discoloration when cooked. If you do refrigerate, letting the potato warm gradually to room temperature before cooking can reduce the discoloration. Avoid areas that reach high temperatures (beneath the sink or beside large appliances) or receive too much sunlight (on the countertop). Perforated plastic bags and paper bags offer the best environment for extending shelf-life. Keep potatoes out of the light. Don’t wash potatoes (or any produce, for that matter) before storing. Dampness promotes early spoilage.

purple carrots

carrots

Carrots are great both raw and cooked. If scrubbed well, you won’t even need to peel them. If cooking carrots, try to cut into even sized pieces so they cook at the same rate. Carrots pair well with thyme, chervil, dill, cumin, ginger, mint, sesame seeds, chili, mustard, honey, butter, olive oil, and sesame oils.

Carrots are best stored in a plastic bag in the vegetable bin of your refrigerator. Remove any tops before storage so the carrot stays crisp and sweet.

red tomatoes

red tomatoesStore tomatoes away from direct sunlight with the stem scar facing up to reduce softening and darkening of the fruit. For short term storage it is best to keep tomatoes in a paper bag at the coolest possible room temperature. Keep out of direct sunlight.

Add a pinch of sugar to tomatoes when cooking them. It enhances the flavor.

To keep baked or stuffed tomatoes from collapsing, bake in greased muffin tins. The tins will give them some support as they cook.

salad mix

salad mixThe trick to storing salad greens is to place them in a container (or plastic bag) with a paper towel in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. You can wash and spin dry the salad mix first for easy use. Change the paper towel regularly if needed.

In addition to traditional salads, greens can be roasted, used as a topping for pizza, or added to green smoothies!

Recipes

apples and celeriacMaple-Bacon Roasted Apples & Celeriac

4 servings, about 1 cup each

1 large celery root (celeriac), about 1 1/2 pounds, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 apples, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 slices bacon, chopped
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme or rosemary or 1/4 teaspoon dried

Preheat oven to 450°F.

Toss celery root with oil, pepper and salt and spread on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast until starting to brown, 10 to 12 minutes. Add apples, toss gently and continue roasting until the apples and celery root are tender, 6 to 10 minutes more.

Meanwhile, cook bacon in a medium skillet over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until just crispy. Remove to a paper-towel-lined plate with a slotted spoon; discard all but 2 teaspoons of the bacon fat. Add maple syrup to the fat in the pan and bring to a boil, scraping up the browned bits. Add the cooked bacon and thyme (or rosemary). When the celery root and apples are tender, gently toss them with the maple-bacon glaze and roast for about 5 minutes more.

Source: Eating Well September/October 2012

cornperppers98 (800x600)Jimmy Nardello Roasted Pepper Salad

1 1/2 lb. Jimmy Nardello Roasted Peppers
3 ears of corn with kernels removed
3 T white balsamic vinegar
3 T olive oil
1/2 salt
1/4 t black pepper
2 T chopped fresh basil

Remove the stems and seeds. Preheat the broiler. Put the peppers, skins up, in an oiled, shallow baking pan. If you wish you can lightly oil the peppers as well. Broil them 2 inches from the heat until softened. You do not need to remove the skins after roasting. Cut the peppers lengthwise into ¼ inch strips. Add the uncooked corn kernels. To complete the salad, toss together the remaining ingredients and let stand, covered, 1 hour for flavors to develop.

Recipe from Full Belly Farm.

CSA August 27, 2014

Notes from the Farm

It’s finally time for sweet corn here in Montana, but unfortunately, the red-winged blackbirds like it as much as we do, so you may notice some gnawing on the ends of your ears. Never fear, just cut them off, and the rest of the corn should be just fine. A special treat in this week’s share is some wildcrafted elderberries in addition to our home grown bounty. Enjoy!

This Week’s CSA

basil

basil_leaves_leaf_224225_l

My favorite use for fresh basil is a caprese salad: fresh tomatoes, basil and mozzarella, drizzled with olive oil and salt. Keep it well wrapped in paper towels inside plastic bag in the vegetable bin of your fridge. It will also brown if crushed by heavier vegetables, so put it on top of your veggie bin. Basil can also be stored upright at room temperature in a glass with a little water; freshly trim the ends before putting in water.

beets

beets

Beets are a versatile root which can be eaten raw, roasted, steamed, grilled, or boiled. Their natural earthy sweetness pairs well with olive oil, sour cream, vinegars, citrus, mustard, horseradish, dill, tarragon, onions, apples, and goat cheese. Red beets bleed and tint everything they touch but leaving the skin, tail, and at least 1 inch of the stems intact while cooking will help keep all those juices locked inside. Once cool to touch, beets are very easy to peel. Beets store best if the greens are removed. With a sharp knife, remove greens just above the stem and store separately in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. The beet root will keep well for weeks in the refrigerator in a paper bag or perforated plastic bag, while the greens are best used within a few days.

carrots

carrots

Carrots are great both raw and cooked. If scrubbed well, you won’t even need to peel them. If cooking carrots, try to cut into even sized pieces so they cook at the same rate. Carrots pair well with thyme, chervil, dill, cumin, ginger, mint, sesame seeds, chili, mustard, honey, butter, olive oil, and sesame oils. Carrots are best stored in a plastic bag in the vegetable bin of your refrigerator. Remove any tops before storage so the carrot stays crisp and sweet.

cucumbers

cucumbersAs they sit, slicing cukes tend to soften, so they are best eaten fresh. Sliced thin, cucumbers are a treat on any sandwich or salad, served on a veggie platter or just eaten fresh with a sprinkling of salt. For a twist on a refreshing summer drink, add very thin slices of cucumber to sparkling water or as a garnish to gin and tonics. Cucumbers also make a refreshing, light salad or can be added to coleslaw. Making sure they are free of dirt and dry, cucumbers can be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for a week or longer. Too much moisture can cause them to mold, so make sure they are exposed to air.  Once cut open, wrap cut end in plastic wrap.

dill

Although native to parts of western Asia, dill weed is usually associated with Russian and European cuisine where it is paired with fish (gravlax), pickles, yogurt, sour cream, and potatoes. Dill also goes well with beets, cabbage, carrots, cucumbers, eggs, cream sauces, and salmon.  Typically the feathery fronds are used and taste best if added fresh at the end of cooking. Store dill in a plastic bag in the refrigerator

green beans

Store unwashed fresh bean pods in a plastic bag kept in the refrigerator crisper. Whole beans stored this way should keep for about seven days. Just prior to using the beans, wash them under running water. Remove both ends of the beans by either snapping them off or cutting them with a knife. Green beans are a classic ingredient in Salad Nicoise, a French cold salad dish that combines steamed green beans with tuna fish and potatoes. Sautéd green beans are great with shiitake mushrooms. Or prepare the perennial favorite, green beans almondine, by sprinkling slivered almonds on healthy sautéed beans.

wildcrafted elderberries

Elderberry_Fruit

These blue or purple berries can be made into elderberry wine, jam, syrup, and pies. The entire flower cluster can be dipped in batter and fried while petals can be eaten raw or made into a fragrant and tasty tea. The flowers aslo add an aromatic flavor and lightness to pancakes or fritters. To store, place elderberries loosely in a shallow container, cover, and refrigerate. Do not wash elderberries until ready to eat, as excess moisture during storage will hasten decay.

paprika peppers

paprika

Paprika peppers can range from mild to hot and this variety falls in the middle. While native to Eastern Europe, many varieties are now grown throughout the world. These small red peppers would make a great addition to stir fries, breakfast scrambles, eggs dishes, pasta dishes and of course, any Hungarian dish.

salad mix

salad mixThe trick to storing salad greens is to place them in a container (or plastic bag) with a paper towel in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. You can wash and spin dry the salad mix first for easy use. Change the paper towel regularly if needed. In addition to traditional salads, greens can be roasted, used as a topping for pizza, or added to green smoothies!

summer squash

summer-squash-crookneck1-lThe delicate flavor, soft shell and creamy white flesh of summer squash is a perfect addition to any summer meal. Wash summer squash under cool running water and then cut off both ends. You can then proceed to cut it into the desired size and shape for the particular recipe. Unlike winter squash, summer squash are more fragile and cannot be stored for long periods of time unless frozen. Summer squash is very fragile and should be handled with care as small punctures will lead to decay. It should be stored unwashed in an air-tight container in the refrigerator, where it will keep for about seven days.

sweet corn

corn

Corn is versatile and can be added to soups, stews, pancakes, bread, soufflés, and casserole dishes.  It can be sautéed, steamed, boiled, creamed, or grilled with great results.  To add corn to a vegetable pickle mix, leave on the cob and slice 1/2 inch thick. In addition to the traditional corn on the cob or succotash, sweet corn makes a grate addition to salsa.  Grilled corn kernels (remove kernels with knife after corn has cooled), roasted peppers, red onion, garlic, black beans, cilantro and lime juice will make a delicious salsa that goes well with tacos and grilled pork or fish.

walla walla (sweet) onions

sweet onions

Sweet onions tend to be lower in sulfur and higher in water content, giving them a mild flavor and perfect for eating fresh in salads and on sandwiches. These onions do not have a long storage life and will last best if stored in a cool dark spot. If the outside layers start to soften, peel and store in the refrigerator. In addition to soup, sweet onions also caramelize well for a sweet onion jam and make for some amazing onion rings.

Recipes

beet salad Roasted Beet and Crisp Lettuce Salad with Toasted Walnuts and Creamy Lemon Vinaigrette

3 large beets, tossed in oil and roasted at 350 until soft all the way through. This will at least 25 minutes. Stick a paring knife into the beet and if it goes in and goes out easily then they should be ready. Cool them on another plate.
1 cup walnuts, toasted at 350 for 5 minutes or until golden brown
2 T extra virgin olive oil
8 oz goat cheese, crumbled
8 cups summer lettuce
5 sprigs mint, leaves removed
5 sprigs parsley, leaves removed
1 shallot, minced
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1 lemon, zested and juiced
Pinch cayenne pepper
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 cup sour cream
Salt and pepper

After beets are cool. Peel them using a paring knife. Gloves are preferred, beets make everything pink! Dice the beets medium dice and reserve in a small bowl. Toss with olive oil, walnuts and lemon zest.
Combine the lettuce and herbs in a salad bowl. In a mini food processor, pulse together the shallot, mustard, vinegar, lemon juice, zest and cayenne. Add the olive oil and pulse again to combine. Add the sour cream and blend for 30 seconds until creamy. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Drizzle over the greens and toss to coat and serve.

Place the dressed greens in a serving bowl and put the beet and walnuts on top. Garnish with goat cheese and enjoy.

Source: Chef Joey Johnson at The Fat Hen

paprikaHomemade Paprika Powder

Did you know that you can make paprika powder at home? You can, but it will take you about a year to complete the process. If you don’t have the patience, you can simply fry your chilis in olive oil with a little garlic. But if you’re game for making your own paprika spice, here’s how to do it:

Chiles need to be dried in arid, hot shade. Drying in the sun bleaches away color. Heat adds an almost cooked aroma to the chiles. And humidity is the enemy.

Once chilis are completely dried, making the powder consists of breaking the peppers into pieces small enough to jam into a spice grinder. Remove the seeds first. The grinding takes a few steps, because you always get a a few pieces that don’t want to grind. Keep sifting the bits through a fine-mesh sieve until you get an even powder.

That’s it! Store in a spice jar and it will last as long as store-bought paprika powder (and taste much better)!

Adapted from: Hunter, Angler, Gardner, Cook

 

 

CSA August 20, 2014

This Week’s CSA

Anaheim peppers

anaheim

Anaheim peppers (also known as chile Verde del Norte) are widely grown throughout northwest Mexico. These light green chiles are long, taper at the base and are usually mild in flavor. These peppers are great in chili, fajitas, burritos, veggie egg scrambles, enchiladas, or salsas, or can be stuffed and baked. As with any pepper, their flavor varies, so please taste test a tiny bit to see how much heat the pepper carries. If you are sensitive to spicy food, you will need to remove any seeds and white ribs from the pepper before cooking. Be aware of cutting hot peppers with bare hands, as you need to wash your hands well before touching any sensitive body areas! If you don’t plan to use them while fresh, the whole chili can be roasted and then frozen for later use.

cabbage

cabbageOf course cabbage can be turned into sauerkraut and makes for some great coleslaw, but this versatile vegetable also takes well to cooking, whether it is sautéed, braised, boiled, or grilled. Cooking cabbage gives off a pungent smell that is a result of a high concentration of sulphur compounds in the vegetable. The combination of thin slicing and brief cooking times can alleviate the strong flavor. Green cabbage pairs well with butter, olive oil, sour cream, cheddar cheese, parmesan, mustard, horseradish, caraway, dill, marjoram, potatoes, apples, apple cider vinegar, and lemon juice. Cabbage can last for a long time stored in a plastic bag in your vegetable crisper but its nutritive value decreases with time. Remove any wilted leaves before using.

dragon tongue beans

dragon

The bright colored dragon tongue beans are considered a heirloom Dutch wax type green bean that originated in the Netherlands.  This yellowish-green bean with variegated purple strips is great both raw and cooked.  Once cooked or pickled, the purple color tends to dissipate.  Like other varieties of bush beans, dragon tongue beans have an edible shell.   Just remove the stem end before cooking.  If not serving raw, these beans will make a great addition to bean salads, stir fries, salads, or cooked on their own for a side dish.  With corn, dragons tongue beans can be used to make a succotash that can be served as a main course or side salad.

green beans

green beans

Store unwashed fresh beans pods in a plastic bag kept in the refrigerator crisper. Whole beans stored this way should keep for about seven days. Just prior to using the green beans, wash them under running water. Remove both ends of the beans by either snapping them off or cutting them with a knife. Green beans are a classic ingredient in Salad Nicoise, a French cold salad dish that combines steamed green beans with tuna fish and potatoes. Sautéd green beans are great with shiitake mushrooms. Or prepare the perennial favorite, green beans almondine, by sprinkling slivered almonds on healthy sautéed beans.

kale

kale

Kale greens pair well with olive oil, parmesan cheese, garlic, potatoes, legumes, pasta, and eggs. To store, wrap kale in a damp towel or in a plastic bag and refrigerate, preferably in crisper drawer, for up to 1 week. To freeze, wash, separate from stem, and blanch leaves for 2 minutes. Rinse in cold water to stop the cooking, drain, and pack into airtight containers such as zip-lock freezer bags.

romaine head lettuce

RomaineLettuce

Also known as Cos, this variety of head forming lettuce has deep green, long leaves with a crisp texture and deep taste. Romaine should be washed and dried before storing in the refrigerator to remove excess moisture. A salad spinner can be very helpful in the drying of lettuce (and other salad ingredients as well). Lettuce should be either stored in a plastic bag or wrapped in a damp cloth and stored in the refrigerator crisper.

summer squash

summer-squash-crookneck1-lThe delicate flavor, soft shell and creamy white flesh of summer squash is a perfect addition to any summer meal. Wash summer squash under cool running water and then cut off both ends. You can then proceed to cut it into the desired size and shape for the particular recipe. Unlike winter squash, summer squash are more fragile and cannot be stored for long periods of time unless frozen. Summer squash is very fragile and should be handled with care as small punctures will lead to decay. It should be stored unwashed in an air-tight container in the refrigerator, where it will keep for about seven days.

walla walla (sweet) onions

sweet onions

Sweet onions tend to be lower in sulfur and higher in water content, giving them a mild flavor and perfect for eating fresh in salads and on sandwiches. These onions do not have a long storage life and will last best if stored in a cool dark spot. If the outside layers start to soften, peel and store in the refrigerator.

In addition to soup, sweet onions also caramelize well for a sweet onion jam and make for some amazing onion rings. Check out www.saveur.com for recipes on fried onion rings.

yellow beans

wax

Yellow wax beans are a yellow version of the familiar green bean.

If you won’t be eating them right away, store in a plastic bag in your refrigerator. If you feel overwhelmed by the beans, they can also be blanched, shocked and then frozen for use later this winter.

Stringing is seldom necessary now that many varieties are stringless but the stem end is often removed since it can be tough. Yellow wax beans are great for snacking on or served on a vegetable tray with your favorite dip.  Yellow wax beans can be treated just like green beans to make your favorite summer bean salad or they can be added to many stir fry dishes.

yukon gold potatoes

yukonYukon Golds are an all purpose potato with a medium starch content so they will respond well to roasting, mashing, or steaming. Their paper thin skins need only be scrubbed lightly before using. Potatoes are best stored in a cool, dark place that is away from onions.

 

Recipes

Green Bean, Yellow Bean, and Cherry Tomato Salad

gbybcts3/4 pound green beans, trimmed
3/4 pound yellow wax beans, trimmed
3 cups cherry tomatoes (about 14 ounces), halved
1 medium-size red onion, thinly sliced
1/2 cup thinly sliced fresh basil
5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon sugar
preparation

Cook all beans in large pot of boiling salted water until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Drain; rinse with cold water and drain well. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Pat dry, then wrap in paper towels. Enclose in plastic bag and refrigerate.)

Combine beans, tomatoes, onion and basil in serving bowl. Whisk oil, vinegar and sugar in small bowl to blend. Season dressing with salt and pepper. Add dressing to vegetables; toss to coat. Cover; chill at least 1 hour and up to 4 hours, tossing occasionally. Serve salad cold or at room temperature.

Source: Epicurious

Seared Cabbage with Anaheim Peppers

1Seared-Cabbage-with-Anaheim-Peppers/2 head cabbage, shredded
4 Anaheim peppers, chopped
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon minced garlic
Juice from 1 lime

Add all ingredients except lime juice to a saute pan.
Saute over medium heat about 20 minutes.
Stir frequently and be sure to scrape the brown bits off the bottom of the saute pan as they contain much of the favor.
Transfer to a serving dish and sprinkle with lime juice.
Serve.

Source: Chili Pepper Madness

CSA August 13, 2014

This Week’s CSA

beets

beets

Beets are a versatile root which can be eaten raw, roasted, steamed, grilled, or boiled. Their natural earthy sweetness pairs well with olive oil, sour cream, vinegars, citrus, mustard, horseradish, dill, tarragon, onions, apples, and goat cheese. Red beets bleed and tint everything they touch but leaving the skin, tail, and at least 1 inch of the stems intact while cooking will help keep all those juices locked inside. Once cool to touch, beets are very easy to peel. Beets store best if the greens are removed. With a sharp knife, remove greens just above the stem and store separately in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. The beet root will keep well for weeks in the refrigerator in a paper bag or perforated plastic bag, while the greens are best used within a few days.

cucumbers

cucumbersAs they sit, slicing cukes tend to soften, so they are best eaten fresh. Sliced thin, cucumbers are a treat on any sandwich or salad, served on a veggie platter or just eaten fresh with a sprinkling of salt. For a twist on a refreshing summer drink, add very thin slices of cucumber to sparkling water or as a garnish to gin and tonics. Cucumbers also make a refreshing, light salad or can be added to coleslaw.

Making sure they are free of dirt and dry, cucumbers can be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for a week or longer. Too much moisture can cause them to mold, so make sure they are exposed to air.  Once cut open, wrap cut end in plastic wrap.

dill

Although native to parts of western Asia, dill weed is usually associated with Russian and European cuisine where it is paired with fish (gravlax), pickles, yogurt, sour cream, and potatoes. Dill also goes well with beets, cabbage, carrots, cucumbers, eggs, cream sauces, and salmon.  Typically the feathery fronds are used and taste best if added fresh at the end of cooking.

Store dill in a plastic bag in the refrigerator

green beans

Store unwashed fresh bean pods in a plastic bag kept in the refrigerator crisper. Whole beans stored this way should keep for about seven days.

Just prior to using the green beans, wash them under running water. Remove both ends of the beans by either snapping them off or cutting them with a knife.

Green beans are a classic ingredient in Salad Nicoise, a French cold salad dish that combines steamed green beans with tuna fish and potatoes. Sautéd green beans are great with shiitake mushrooms. Or prepare the perennial favorite, green beans almondine, by sprinkling slivered almonds on healthy sautéed beans.

purple carrots

carrots

Carrots are great both raw and cooked. If scrubbed well, you won’t even need to peel them. If cooking carrots, try to cut into even sized pieces so they cook at the same rate. Carrots pair well with thyme, chervil, dill, cumin, ginger, mint, sesame seeds, chili, mustard, honey, butter, olive oil, and sesame oils.

Carrots are best stored in a plastic bag in the vegetable bin of your refrigerator. Remove any tops before storage so the carrot stays crisp and sweet.

salad mix

salad mixThe trick to storing salad greens is to place them in a container (or plastic bag) with a paper towel in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. You can wash and spin dry the salad mix first for easy use. Change the paper towel regularly if needed.

In addition to traditional salads, greens can be roasted, used as a topping for pizza, or added to green smoothies!

strawberries
In addition to being consumed fresh, strawberries can be frozen, made into preserves, as well as dried and used in prepared foods, such as cereal bars. Strawberries and strawberry flavorings are a popular addition to dairy products, such as strawberry-flavored milk, strawberry ice cream, strawberry milkshakes, strawberry smoothies and strawberry yogurts.
Store strawberries in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

zucchini (1)

This versatile veggie can be sautéed, baked, stuffed, grilled, added to soups, and grated for baked goods.  Zucchini partners well with butter, yogurt, Parmesan cheese, garlic, dill, basil, marjoram, mint, lemon, walnuts, tomatoes, and peppers. Store zucchini in a plastic bag in the refrigerator; excessive moisture will cause molding.

 

yellow crookneck summer squash

summer-squash-crookneck1-lThe delicate flavor, soft shell and creamy white flesh of summer squash is a perfect addition to any summer meal.

Wash summer squash under cool running water and then cut off both ends. You can then proceed to cut it into the desired size and shape for the particular recipe.

Unlike winter squash, summer squash are more fragile and cannot be stored for long periods of time unless frozen. Summer squash is very fragile and should be handled with care as small punctures will lead to decay. It should be stored unwashed in an air-tight container in the refrigerator, where it will keep for about seven days.

Recipes

Braised Green Beans and Summer Vegetables

green beans and veg

makes 6 servings, about 1 cup each

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 small onion, halved and sliced
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh oregano , or 1 teaspoon dried
1/2 cup white wine , or reduced-sodium chicken broth
1 pound green beans, trimmed
1 medium summer squash , or zucchini, halved and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 cup halved cherry tomatoes , or grape tomatoes
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/4 cup finely shredded Parmesan cheese
Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and oregano and cook, stirring, until softened and beginning to brown, about 2 minutes. Add wine (or broth) and bring to a boil. Add green beans, reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook for 10 minutes, stirring once or twice. Add summer squash (or zucchini) and tomatoes and continue cooking until the vegetables are tender, 8 to 10 minutes more. Season with salt and pepper. Serve sprinkled with Parmesan.

From EatingWell:  May/June 2009

Paleo Chocolate Zucchini Bread

paleo choc bread

Makes 1 loaf
1 ¼ cups blanched almond flour
¼ cup cacao powder
¼ teaspoon celtic sea salt
½ teaspoon baking soda
2 large eggs
2 tablespoons coconut oil
¼ cup honey
¼ teaspoon vanilla stevia
¾ cup zucchini, grated
In a food processor combine almond flour and cacao powder.
Pulse in salt and baking soda.
Pulse in eggs, coconut oil and honey, stevia, then zucchini.
Transfer batter to a greased 6.5 x 4 inch baby loaf pan, dusted with almond flour.
Bake at 350° for 35-40 minutes.
Cool for 2 hours.
Serve.

CSA August 6, 2014 (2)

Notes from the Farm

This is Renee, your webmaster, here. It looks like I jumped the gun and accidentally sent out information about this week’s vegetables yesterday. Sorry about that!

Here are some ideas of how to use some of the items in this week’s CSA share:

Recipes

zucchini kale saladGrilled Zucchini Ribbon and Kale Salad

1 bunch kale
3-4 small zucchini
blue cheese crumbles
cashews
salt
pepper

olive oil
lemon juice
honey

Slice the zucchini into ribbons using a mandoline or vegetable peeler.

Tear the kale away from the stems in little chunks.

Lightly coat the grates of a grill with cooking spray. Bring the grill to medium-high heat and arrange the ribbons on the grates. Lightly sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Once you start to see browning where the grates are, you can use some tongs and just remove them from the grill. The ribbons are so thin, there’s no real need to flip and grill the other side.

To make the dressing, whisk together some olive oil, lemon juice, honey, and a pinch of salt and pepper.

Lightly toast your cashews.

Toss the kale with the dressing in a bowl. Arrange on a plate and top with grilled zucchini ribbons, cashews, and a good sprinkling of blue cheese.

adapted from: Tablespoon.com

sauteed red cabbageSauteed Red Cabbage

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 small onion, sliced
1/2 red cabbage, shredded
1/3 cup white or apple cider vinegar, eyeball it
2 rounded tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon mustard seed
Salt and pepper

Heat a skillet over medium high heat. Add oil and onion and saute 2 minutes. Add cabbage and turn in pan, sauteing it until it wilts, 3 to 5 minutes. Add vinegar to the pan and turn the cabbage in it. Sprinkle sugar over the cabbage and turn again. Season with mustard seed, salt and pepper and reduce heat a bit. Let cabbage continue to cook 10 minutes or until ready to serve, stirring occasionally.

Source: Food Network

CSA August 6, 2014

This Week’s CSA

basil

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My favorite use for fresh basil is a caprese salad: fresh tomatoes, basil and mozzarella, drizzled with olive oil and salt.

Keep it well wrapped in paper towels inside plastic bag in the vegetable bin of your fridge. It will also brown if crushed by heavier vegetables, so put it on top of your veggie bin. Basil can also be stored upright at room temperature in a glass with a little water; freshly trim the ends before putting in water.

carrots

carrots

Carrots are great both raw and cooked. If scrubbed well, you won’t even need to peel them. If cooking carrots, try to cut into even sized pieces so they cook at the same rate. Carrots pair well with thyme, chervil, dill, cumin, ginger, mint, sesame seeds, chili, mustard, honey, butter, olive oil, and sesame oils.

Carrots are best stored in a plastic bag in the vegetable bin of your refrigerator. Remove any tops before storage so the carrot stays crisp and sweet.

garlic

green garlicGreen garlic, which is the immature plant, has not been cured for winter storage so it needs to be stored in the refrigerator.  It should last for up to two weeks stored in a crisper. The green tops should be cut off the fresh garlic before storage. Fresh garlic is milder than mature cloves so feel free to use a healthy dose in cooking. Fresh garlic is also easy to peel. Cut off the dried core end of the clove and using the tip of a knife, lift up the skin to remove.

green-bell-pepperGreen bell peppers are, in fact, the unripe bell pepper, whereas other bell pepper colors are ripe. Green bell peppers are often sweeter than the colored varieties of bell peppers but taste and texture of the bell pepper can be also be affected by growing, storage conditions and cultivar species.

Bell peppers will make a great addition to some homemade chili.  For a more complex flavor, try roasting the peppers before adding to chili.

Green peppers will usually stay fresh longer than orange or red peppers. Store in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

kale

kale

Kale greens pair well with olive oil, parmesan cheese, garlic, potatoes, legumes, pasta, and eggs. To store, wrap kale in a damp towel or in a plastic bag and refrigerate, preferably in crisper drawer, for up to 1 week. To freeze, wash, separate from stem, and blanch leaves for 2 minutes. Rinse in cold water to stop the cooking, drain, and pack into airtight containers such as zip-lock freezer bags.

 

red cabbage

red cabbage

Red cabbage displays brilliant leaves of either a crimson or purple color with white veins running through them, and with its hue comes additional health benefits not found in green cabbage.

Red cabbage is often used raw for salads and coleslaw. This vegetable can be eaten cooked. It is the traditional accompanying side dish paired with many German meals—most notably, Sauerbrauten. Keep cabbage cold to help retain its vitamin C content.

shell peas
 Peas only take a few minutes to cook, particularly when they’re very fresh and young, so they’re a perfect ingredient for fast weeknight dishes. In fact, the secret to maintaining their sweetness and bright-green color is to cook them as little as possible, just enough to make them tender. What’s more, peas lend themselves to almost any cooking method, from boiling and steaming to sautéeing,Store pods in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator and use them within a couple of days.

stir fry mixTo make a quick and easy stir-fry of greens: Heat wok over high heat. Add one teaspoon to one tablespoon of oil. Add garlic or chilis, if desired. Add greens, and cook, stirring frequently for one or two minutes. Add sauce if desired.

Greens store best in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

 

 

strawberries
In addition to being consumed fresh, strawberries can be frozen, made into preserves, as well as dried and used in prepared foods, such as cereal bars. Strawberries and strawberry flavorings are a popular addition to dairy products, such as strawberry-flavored milk, strawberry ice cream, strawberry milkshakes, strawberry smoothies and strawberry yogurts.
Store strawberries in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

zucchini (1)

This versatile veggie can be sautéed, baked, stuffed, grilled, added to soups, and grated for baked goods.  Zucchini partners well with butter, yogurt, Parmesan cheese, garlic, dill, basil, marjoram, mint, lemon, walnuts, tomatoes, and peppers. Store zucchini in a plastic bag in the refrigerator; excessive moisture will cause molding.