Veggie Feast (CSA) July 17, 2019

Notes from the Farm

Although convenient and cost effective we decided not to order chicks from the hatchery this year.  Living conditions in many factory farms can be marginal, or downright awful so we are turning the task over to our hens (who all seem to be in the mood to nest this summer). They are having some success!  Five more chicks hatched out on Saturday.  We have four mama hens teaching their chicks how to be free range farm chickens.  Maybe you will spot them when picking up your vegetables.

This Week’s Veggie Feast

Veggie Feast July 17, 2019

Snow peas, snap peas, romaine, parsley, turnips, fresh garlic, summer squash, cilantro

New This Week

Snap peas

Snap peas are some of the sweetest, crunchiest, juiciest veggies ever!  Of course they can be sauteed, lightly steamed and added to salads and dishes, but why not just eat them right out of the sack?  They store pretty well in the fridge.

Romaine lettuce

Romaine has a thicker leaf structure than many lettuces, giving it that great crunch so many love in Caesar salad.  Although we soak the lettuce heads in water and get it as clean as possible you will still need to give it a rinse once you strip the leaves off for your salad.

Turnips

Salad turnips are in the same family as broccoli, cabbage, radishes … It seems humans need to thank the Brassicaceae family for giving us so much nutrition.  Salad turnips can be eaten raw, like a radish or lightly steamed.

Yellow zucchini

This is the first year we decided not to plant yellow crookneck squash.  We have grown crookneck for years, but judging from the farmer’s market table it was not nearly as popular as zucchini.  Golden zucchini is a first for us, so let us know how you like it.

Recipes

This recipe is fairly involved, but good for the gourmets out there.  Smitten Kitchen is an entertaining and funny blog suggested by one of my friends who is passionate about cooking.

Roberta’s Roasted Garlic Caesar Salad

  • SERVINGS: 2, BUT YOU’LL HAVE EXTRA WALNUTS AND DRESSING
You’ll have extra dressing (it makes 1 1/2 to 1 2/3 cups) and extra walnuts (it makes about 2 1/4 cups). The dressing keeps for one week in the fridge. The walnuts will keep easily 2 weeks in a jar at room temperature.
ROASTED GARLIC DRESSING
  • 1 head of garlic
  • 3/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon (175 grams) olive oil, plus a splash for the garlic
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled
  • 2 teaspoons (10 grams) smooth dijon mustard
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons (21 grams) white wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons (28 grams) sherry vinegar
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 5 anchovy fillets
  • Juice of half a lemon, plus more if needed
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
CANDIED WALNUTS
    • 2 cups (180 grams) walnut halves
    • 2 large egg whites
    • 3 packed tablespoons (30 grams) dark brown sugar
    • 1/4 cup (75 grams) honey
    • Freshly ground black pepper
    • 1 teaspoon (5 grams) kosher salt
ASSEMBLY
  • 2 romaine hearts, ends trimmed, leaves separated
  • 1/3 cup roasted garlic dressing (above)
  • 2 ounces pecorino romano cheese
  • A handful of candied walnuts (above)
  • Freshly ground black pepper

To make the roasted garlic dressing: Heat your oven to 350°F. Cut a quarter inch off the head of garlic and place the head, cut side up, on a big square of aluminum foil. Drizzle lightly with olive oil. Wrap it tightly in the foil and bake for a little less than 1 hour.

Remove the garlic from the oven and let it cool in the foil. Squeeze the roasted garlic out of 4 or 5 cloves and set the rest aside for another use (“its really good just spread on grilled bread,” the book tells us). Leave the oven on for the walnuts.

Put the roasted garlic, the raw clove of garlic, mustard, vinegars, egg yolks, anchovies, and lemon juice into a blender or food processor and blend for 30 seconds or until combined. With the machine one, add the olive oil in a slow, thin stream until it’s incorporated and the dressing looks smooth. Taste and add salt, pepper, and more lemon juice as desired.

Meanwhile, make the walnuts: Put the nuts on a baking sheet and toast 8 minutes, turing your baking sheet and tossing the nuts around halfway through.Remove them from the oven and let them cool. Turn the oven down to 275°F. Cover a large baking sheet with foil and (do what I didn’t do), coat the foil with nonstick cooking spray.

In a large bowl, whisk the egg whites until they begin to have body but not until they form soft peaks. Add the brown sugar, honey, and about 10 turns of a pepper grinder’s worth of black pepper to the whites, and combine. Add the walnuts to the mixture and mix until they’re all well coated. Spread them on the prepared baking sheet and sprinkle them evenly with the salt. Bake for about 24 minutes, turning the baking sheet about halfway through. The nuts should be dry and not sticky. Remove them from the oven and let them cool.

To assemble: Place the romaine leaves in a large bowl. Pour about 1/4 cup roasted garlic dressing over the leaves, using your fingers to toss and coat the leaves evenly. (The book warns that tongs will damage the leaves here, and won’t distribute the dressing as easily.) Use the remaining tablespoon or so if needed, to taste (Romaine hearts vary a lot in size).

Divide the lettuce between two plates. Grate the Pecorino over each plate. Scatter the walnuts over the two plates and give each a grind of black pepper. Eat with a knife and fork, blissfully.

Source:  Smitten Kitchen

Burrata with Charred and Raw Sugar Snap Peas

If you can’t find burrata, look for buffalo mozzarella, and if you can’t find that, just fine the freshest that you can. You might find that you want up to a pound of it as it doesn’t spread out into as many bites as burrata. Slice it open (or into a few thick slices, laid out on a plate), and let it warm up if you’ve got the time. It makes a big difference. “In a perfect world, mozzarella will never have been refrigerated, but these are imperfect times,” Music explains, to my delight.

  • 1 8-ounce ball burrata
  • Olive oil, for drizzling and brushing
  • Flaky sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Half a lemon
  • 1 pound sugar snap peas
  • 1 to 2 thick-cut slices crusty bread (I’m using miche here)
  • A handful of mint and basil leaves, torn or thinly sliced
  • Chiles in oil or red pepper flakes to serve

Butterfly your burrata: Drain burrata and gently dab dry on a paper towel. Place on serving platter. Begin to cut in half vertically (i.e. into left and right halves) but stop halfway and turn knife sideways (in either direction) and cut out to wall of burrata but not through. Use knife to flip it open onto the plate, then spread the center cream a bit into a flat layer. Repeat on second side. Drizzle lightly with olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. Let sit at room temperature while you prepare everything else, or up to an hour, if you have the time. Taking the chill off it is the key for the creamiest insides and best flavor.Trim/de-string your sugar snaps and place in a large bowl. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil (or more, to taste), many grinds of black pepper, and sea salt and toss to evenly coat.

Grate or shred your bread with your fingers into coarse crumbs. I omitted my crusts because they were stale and very dark. You want a little shy of 1 cup.

Grill instructions: Prepare your grill for medium-high direct heat.

Make the crumbs on the grill: Place a small cast iron frying pan on a medium-high heat on your grill and place the torn bread and a glug of olive oil inside, enough to dampen the crumbs. Season with salt and cook the crumbs, stirring from time to time, until they’re golden and crisp. About a minute before they reach the perfect color, finely grate the zest of half a lemon over them and stir to heat and combine. Set crumbs aside.

Grill your sugar snaps: Place half your prepared sugar snaps in on a wire rack or grill basket on a grill and grill, tossing occasionally, until charred in spots, about 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer back to bowl with remaining raw sugar snaps and toss to combine.

Stove instructions: Make the crumbs on the stove by following the above instructions but use a large, heavy frying pan over medium-high heat, the same one you’ll use again for the sugar snaps. Scoop the crumbs out into a bowl to cool.

Blister your sugar snaps on the stove: Heat the large, heavy frying pan you used for the crumbs over high heat. Add half of prepared sugar snaps and cook, tossing occasionally, until charred in spots, about 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer back to bowl with remaining raw sugar snaps and toss to combine.

To finish: Scatter charred and raw sugar snap mixture over butterflied burrata along with crumbs. Drizzle with more olive oil, flaky sea salt. Add mint or basil leaves and serve with chiles in oil or red pepper flakes to taste.

Source:  Smitten Kitchen